Kalarrytes: Photojourney to a Remote Greek Mountain Village

At one time Kalarrytes was rather quite famous, today the ancient Greek village located in the Epirus region of Greece is home to 15 households –  that’s not a typo!

Kalarrytes sites on the edge of a cliff on the western slopes of the Pindos Mountain Range above the Kalarrytikos Gorge.

In its heyday it was famous for its silver and goldsmiths, and was one of the major sites of silversmiths of the entire Balkans!  Today, in a way the legend still lives on –  its most famous resident is  Sotirios Voulgaris, the founder of BVLGARI, a world-famous jewellery and luxury goods company!

Despite being remotely located in Epirus, its location is quite strategic, as it connects Thessaly with Epirus and the Ioanian Sea, which perhaps provides a clue as to why the region was inhabited as early as 10 AD.

What I really found unique about Kalarrytes is that every home has a water fountain.  The water fountains serve a practical purpose in providing spring water to each household, but also a social function since they are often where social gatherings are held. Furthermore they represent the identity of the residents and serve as orientation points.  I find that last point quite comical, since the village is SO small, even I couldn’t get lost!

Given the importance of fountains, each one naturally has a name.  So how do you name a fountain?  You consider its position, name it after a local tradition or the name of the donor.

So what’s it really like to live in such a small remote village? I was hoping to ask a resident and find out…but unfortunately I didn’t see a single person.  Not one!

But I can tell you that there are a wide range of outdoor activities you can do nearby, including an 18km circular hike from Kalarrytes to Syrrako, a neighbouring village across the Chrousia’s Ravine. And there’s so much you can do and see in Epirus! Take a look and you’ll see why I fell in love with Kalarrytes  and recommend a visit:
Kalarrytes, a village on the western slopes of the Pindos Mountain Range in Epirus, Greece

Kalarrytes, an ancient Greek village in Epirus, Greece
Traditional roofs dominate the village and complement the rugged mountain landscape.

Many of the homes have blue doors in the mountainside village of Kalarrytes in Greece.

One of the many fountains that Kalarrytes, a Greek village on the western slopes of the Pindos Mountain Range,  is famous for.
One of the many fountains that Kalarrytes is famous for.

Kallarytes, located on the western slopes of the Pindos Mountain Range in Epirus, Greece

Kalarrytes lies between the mountains of Peristeri and Tzoumerka in Greece.

Tips for Visiting The Ancient Greek Village of Kalarrytes

  • You will need a car, as there is no public transportation.
  • If you’re just visiting the village itself, an hour is long enough to walk around and explore, but the area is so beautiful it makes sense to spend more time there.  If I went back I would do the hike to the village of Syrrako, mentioned above.
  • There is one cafe there, but it was closed when I was there.
  • There is no place to stay…unless you are lucky enough to meet a local who offers you a place to stay.
  • Can’t get enough of Greek villages? Then check out Global Grasshopper’s list of Greek villages to visit.

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About Author

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Laurel
Laurel Robbins is the founder of Monkeys and Mountains, an adventure travel blog and company that helps people plan their hiking, cycling and wildlife vacations in a sustainable way. Although Canadian, she lives in Munich, Germany. You can find her hiking in the mountains on most weekends.

Comments

January 12, 2015
What a stunning stunning place... We spent a week in Santorini last year which I took about 50,000 pictures of, but this is equally lovely! :)
January 18, 2015
@Emma - I hear yeah about the photos, I went crazy too!
January 13, 2015
I love the bright blue doors in your photos! The Greeks really know how to brighten up their countryside. :-)
January 18, 2015
@Joy - Agreed! So cheerful!

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