Zulu Language: The Coolest Sounding Language I’ve Ever Heard

Zulu Language: The Coolest Sounding Language I’ve Ever Heard

Zulu language is simply the coolest language I’ve ever heard.

I love the clicking sounds, which sound easy to imitate, but in reality take some practice as I discovered during my time in the Drakensberg, S. Africa.   Thandekaximba (featured in the Zulu language video below) laughed at me.  I practiced my Zulu with Eric when we toured his Zulu Village and with his brother Wiseman, our guide in the Drakensberg on our hike to Orange Peel Gap.  Despite my practice, I did not succeed in speaking anything that sounded remotely like Zulu, although I did entertain them with my attempts.  What do you think?  How easy would it be to learn the Zulu language which is spoken by 10 million people?

And shocker, I know, but yes that is me in the video asking Thandekaximba to make the baboon sound :).

Thandekaximba (try pronouncing that name properly!) was our guide to the Main Cave where I saw thousands of year old cave drawings (post to follow).  I  stayed at the  Giants Castle Chalets which conveniently was the start of the trail to the Main Caves AND I had this view from my private chalet:

Lesotho, South Africa

The Giants Castle Chalets are a great place to practice your Zulu!

Contact the Contact the South Africa Tourism Site (in German) or the South African Tourism Site (in English) for more info on how you can learn Zulu in the Drakensberg.

Note:  I was a guest of Giants Castle Chalets but all opinions expressed remain my own.

Laurel Robbins is the founder of Monkeys and Mountains, an adventure travel blog and company that helps people plan their active holidays in a sustainable way. Although Canadian, she lives in Germany. You can find her in the mountains on most weekends.
2016-06-02T14:39:40+00:00

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Zulu Language: The Coolest Sounding Language I’ve Ever Heard

Zulu language is simply the coolest language I’ve ever heard.

I love the clicking sounds, which sound easy to imitate, but in reality take some practice as I discovered during my time in the Drakensberg, S. Africa.   Thandekaximba (featured in the Zulu language video below) laughed at me.  I practiced my Zulu with Eric when we toured his Zulu Village and with his brother Wiseman, our guide in the Drakensberg on our hike to Orange Peel Gap.  Despite my practice, I did not succeed in speaking anything that sounded remotely like Zulu, although I did entertain them with my attempts.  What do you think?  How easy would it be to learn the Zulu language which is spoken by 10 million people?

And shocker, I know, but yes that is me in the video asking Thandekaximba to make the baboon sound :).

Thandekaximba (try pronouncing that name properly!) was our guide to the Main Cave where I saw thousands of year old cave drawings (post to follow).  I  stayed at the  Giants Castle Chalets which conveniently was the start of the trail to the Main Caves AND I had this view from my private chalet:

Lesotho, South Africa

The Giants Castle Chalets are a great place to practice your Zulu!

Contact the Contact the South Africa Tourism Site (in German) or the South African Tourism Site (in English) for more info on how you can learn Zulu in the Drakensberg.

Note:  I was a guest of Giants Castle Chalets but all opinions expressed remain my own.

Laurel Robbins is the founder of Monkeys and Mountains, an adventure travel blog and company that helps people plan their active holidays in a sustainable way. Although Canadian, she lives in Germany. You can find her in the mountains on most weekends.
2016-06-02T14:39:39+00:00

8 Comments

  1. Kurt June 14, 2012 at 12:54 am - Reply

    I fell that these languages are dying fast. It is such a shame.

  2. InsideJourneys June 14, 2012 at 3:24 am - Reply

    Hahaha, I also made a video of our guide at Giant’s Castle speaking Zulu.
    Our guide’s name was Charles, Price Charles. He said he would be retiring a few months after we visited. It was great to hear everyone speaking Zulu. Maybe because of the strong Zulu influence, Durban, to me, had a more distinct African identity.

  3. InsideJourneys June 14, 2012 at 3:26 am - Reply

    What a view!

  4. Italian Notes June 14, 2012 at 7:19 am - Reply

    I gave up on the glottal stop trying to learn Arabic, so I don’t think, I’d stand a chance with the Zulu clicking sounds.

  5. Zhu June 16, 2012 at 2:56 pm - Reply

    It does sound cool and I had never heard it before!

    To me, one of the coolest-sounding language is Portuguese from Brazil. It sounds so different than Spanish, yet when you read it, it is so similar! It’s the pronunciation that makes it stand apart.

  6. Jenna June 17, 2012 at 6:20 am - Reply

    🙂 When I was a grad student in linguistics, I studied phonetics/phonology in depth and learned about the 4 clicks. They do seem like they would be similar but as you said, it’s more complicated than one would imagine since they’re made on different places of the palate. I would love to go there someday to hear the language. You must have had a wonderful trip!

  7. Casper Wayne June 18, 2012 at 10:20 pm - Reply

    Inasmuch as Zulu language may sound cool when you hear the natives talking, it is one of hardest language to learn. I was in South Africa for about and I attempted to learn it too but it wasn’t easy. It is just amazing how the people who speak it do it with ease.

  8. Jennifer July 19, 2012 at 11:07 pm - Reply

    Wow, what a cool language! Thanks for the video otherwise I may have never heard Zulu. And good for you at least attempting to learn. I am sure the locals really appreciated the attempt!

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