Trollinger: A Good German Wine?

Trollinger german wine

Asking the question is “Trollinger a good German wine?” is asking for trouble.

Trollinger wine is only produced in Württemberg an area in SW Germany that lies primarily between Stuttgart and Heilbronn and these residents called Swabians are likely to answer along the lines of “Of course.  It’s aromatic, fruity with a hint of strawberry, plus its a local specialty.”  Germans who reside outside the region are likely to answer with a face screwed up in disgust that says it all, with a wave of their hand dismissing the Swabians as silly for thinking that Trollinger is a good wine.  Non-wine aficionados are more likely to remain more neutral, most likely never having heard of Trollinger.

Württemberg is one of only a few places in the world that produces the Trollinger grape and most of it is consumed locally.  Only a small fraction of it is exported, making Trollinger a rare wine.  Unlike other items that are rare because they are so precious like yellow diamonds, Trollinger is rare for another reason.  It is perhaps one would say…an acquired taste.  In watching many expat friends taste their first sip of Trollinger I’ve heard things like “it tastes like cough syrup”, “it’s so metallic” or “it tastes like rancid berries.”  Don’t let a Swabian hear you say that though, they’re very proud of their Trollinger wines.  I’m personally not a big fan of it as I find  it doesn’t go down as smooth as other wines – i.e. I feel a slight burning in my throat when I drink it.  Having said that, I would recommend trying it when you’re in the Stuttgart region as it is one of the few places you will find it – but perhaps start with a glass first before ordering a bottle.  So what do you think, is Trollinger a good German wine?

Join in the fun by sharing your own Food Friday post.  It could be a tasty meal you’ve had, a recipe, restaurant review, or food photography, whatever tickles your fancy and it doesn’t have to be travel related.  What you consider local might be exotic to someone else.  To join in the fun of Food Friday:

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Comments

  1. says

    I’m in the ‘never heard of it’ camp but I’d definitely give it a go. I’m no wine snob and if it’s drinkable, I’ll drink it – and tell the locals how good it is, of course. :)
    Julia

  2. Laurel says

    @Mette – Oh good, I’m on my way over now to check it out. Thanks for sharing.

    @CN Heidelberg – It’s definitely worth trying – at least once.

    @Julia – I’d never heard of it either until I lived in Stuttgart. I’m not a wine snob either, but even I’m not a fan of it. Worth trying though.

  3. Sabrina says

    Hmmm, lived in Swabia for a while and somehow got around ever trying this “delicacy” :) Sounds a little too acidy for my taste. Have you tried another very, very Swabian dish? Spaetzle with lentils? Tastes much better than it sounds :)

    I submitted a rib recipe for your Food Fridays. Enjoy!

  4. Laurel says

    @Sabrina – What? How is that possible? :). I love spaetzle with lentils, even though it doesn’t sound very good. Will check out your rib post. Thanks for participating in Food Friday.

    @Cathy – It’s definitely worth a try. I’ve had it quite a few times, mostly when I’m with Swabian friends :)

  5. Jenna says

    It doesn’t exactly shound great…but that is one of the things I love about Europe. There are so many traditions that vary from region to region. It reminds me of the wine-making in Moravia. The Czechs are very proud of their wine, and it is culturally quite important, even if it isn’t to everyone’s taste.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] part of the Food Friday fun here’s a link to ExpatGermany’s post on the German wine Trollinger, which may or may not taste good with pickled [...]

  2. [...] the original post here: Trollinger: A Good German Wine? | Expat in Germany Share and [...]

  3. [...] for updates on this topic.Powered by WP Greet Box WordPress PluginIt’s Food Friday over at Expat in Germany, so I decided to introduce you to the best ribs I’ve ever had. To understand just how good [...]

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